Käthe Kollwitz and Berlin: Exhibit at Galerie Parterre Berlin

July 8th marked the 150th birthday of Käthe Kollwitz, the beloved German artist who many know as the sculptor of Mother with Her Dead Son, which can be seen inside Neue Wache in Berlin (though not at the moment as the memorial is under renovation).

GalerieParterre1Galerie Parterre Berlin is hosting an exhibition of Kollwitz’s work – Käthe Kollwitz und Berlin – through September 24, 2017. The gallery is situated on Danziger Strasse, on the former site of the gasworks of Prenzlauer Berg and is a fascinating space in and of itself.

Prenzlauer Berg is a fitting location for this exhibit, as Kollwitz lived in the neighborhood from 1891 through 1943, on the street that is now known as Kollwitz Strasse. The park on the street also bears her name and features a large sculpture of the artist. Continue reading “Käthe Kollwitz and Berlin: Exhibit at Galerie Parterre Berlin”

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Contests for Already Published (Poetry) Books – Updated

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Because this list gets a lot of page views, I’ve moved it to my new website blog and updated it with new links and new awards. If anyone knows of additional contests for already published books (or galleys), please post a comment and I will add to the list.

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Recent updates: Added Nebraska Book Awards, Society of Midland Authors Awards, Midwest Book Awards. Several website links updated.

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BOOK AWARDS FOR POETRY BOOKS

Note: advice of most of these contests is to submit book as soon as possible during submission period.

Continue reading “Contests for Already Published (Poetry) Books – Updated”

3 Ways Authors Get Off Track with Characters

I get it. Characters change over the course of a novel. On an emotional level, the characters you start with may be completely different by the end of the story. As a copy editor who works closely with independent publishers, the issue I see is that characters sometimes change nicknames, eye color, or other physical characteristics throughout the course of the story. That is a huge potential problem.

Writing a novel takes a long time. Even consecutive chapters may be written several months apart. When you’re writing an important scene in chapter 31, you don’t want to have to go back through the first several chapters to look up whether or not the childhood neighbor (who has suddenly resurfaced) had a mustache. So let’s say you put one in, having the main character recall something about how it bristled, and this memory is an extremely important key to solving a decades-long mystery.

Read the rest of this article I contributed to the WOW! Women on Writing Newsletter.